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The First Furlough – Part 2

Here are the next three episodes in the 1952 furlough story.

Beetle Bailey daily strips, March 17 to 19, 1952.

Beetle Bailey daily strips, March 17 to 19, 1952.

Beetle’s family, Mom, Pop and Chigger Bailey each had their own strip in this sequence. His mother is trying to get him to clean up his room, similar to the way his sister Lois would nag his nephew Chip in the comic strip that would make its debut two years later. His father, “Gurney,” was a World War I veteran, which would have made him over fifty years old in 1952. His younger brother Chigger assumes that Beetle’s life in the army is much more adventurous than it really is.
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Showme

After Mort Walker served in the Army during World War II, he enrolled at the University of Missouri and became editor of the campus magazine. In his 1975 autobiography, Backstage at the Strips, Mort recounted his days working on the Missouri Showme.

“The magazine was quite an experience, a better ‘school’ than the school itself. I wrote many of the articles, drew cartoons and illustrations, did layouts, proofread, set type by hand, sold ads, worked directly with the printer, did four-color hand separations for the covers, sold the magazine on the street corners of the campus, and took the unsold copies to the used-paper dump for sale.”
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Beetle in Bronze

“The University of Missouri, approached me to do a sculpture of Beetle Bailey for the campus, since I was a graduate,” Mort Walker explained in his autobiography.

“I had seen a sculpture by Gutzon Borglum (the Mount Rushmore creator) of Lincoln seated on a bench with space beside him. I had watched kids climb up to sit with Lincoln and get their pictures taken. So I adapted the idea and designed Beetle sitting in a booth at the Shack with room beside him.”
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